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The International School for Holocaust Studies

Featured Books

In this section, we feature Holocaust-related literature that may be of interest to educators and the general public. Many of the articles discuss ways to use the featured book in classrooms. This page will be updated regularly as the staff at the International School for Holocaust Studies prepares more reviews.

The Diary of Éva Heyman

The Diary of Éva Heyman

by Éva Heyman, Agnes Zsolt (Editor), Moshe M. Kohn (Translator)
Published 1988 by Shapolsky Publishers

“Dear diary, […] you’re my best friend and I mustn’t keep any secret from you.”
These are the words that describe the relationship between the teenager Éva Heyman and her diary. Her diary was her best friend to whom she could reveal her deepest secrets. Éva locked her diary so that “no one will ever know my secrets”...
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Who Was Who In and Around the Secret Annexe?

Who Was Who In and Around the Secret Annexe?

Anne Frank House, 2013, Amsterdam
Annelies Marie Frank would have celebrated her 84th birthday this year had she survived the Holocaust. Despite the passage of time, her story as one of the one-and-a-half million Jewish children who were murdered in the Holocaust continues to be well known. Her diary – found following her family's deportation – has touched the hearts and minds of millions of readers. More than one million people every year still visit this Holocaust-related authentic site where she and her family hid for two years...
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Fateless

FATELESS

Imre Kertész, Northwestern University Press, 1992
This book review begins on a philosophical note occasioned by the title of the book. The title – Fateless– is a lexical construct that is not listed in most English dictionaries but it follows the form of a descriptive word, an adjective. So, the author of Fateless, Imre Kertesz, has in his thinly veiled memoir of his own Holocaust experiences, chosen to give his book an intriguing title that appears to contradict the terrible fate of six million Jews in Europe and the suffering of those that survived...
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Justyna's Narrative

Justyna's Narrative

Gusta Davidson Draenger,
University of Massachusette Press, Amherst

This book, Justyna's Narrative, is Gusta Davidson Draenger’s account of the activities of the Krakow Jewish Resistance, especially the Akiba youth group to which she belonged. It is actually like a diary of events, and was first published in 1946, in Polish. Gusta only uses Polish code names for the Akiba group members in her diary, so as not to endanger them. Her code name, "Justyna," is used throughout the narrative and throughout this review.
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Teaching Controversial Issues in the Classroom: Key Issues and Debates

Teaching Controversial Issues in the Classroom: Key Issues and Debates

Edited by Paula Cowan and Henry Maitles, London: Continuum, 2012.
Lifelong learning has been defined as the “lifelong, voluntary, and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. As such, it not only enhances social inclusion, active citizenship and personal development, but also competitiveness and employability”. In recent years, the European Commission has invested a considerable amount of funds to support a program that enables people at all stages of their lives to take part in stimulating learning experiences, as well as develop the education and training sectors across Europe.
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The Holocaust and Other Genocides: An Introduction

The Holocaust and Other Genocides: An Introduction

Wichert ten Have and Barbara Boender, Amsterdam: NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and Amsterdam University Press, 2012
This new anthology, edited by Wichert ten Have and Barbara Boender who are affiliated with NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, contains five articles that focus on different cases of genocide during the twentieth century. The last article focuses on legal definitions of genocide as well as various institutions and tribunals that have been created to seek justice and or punish perpetrators of genocidal crimes.
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Where is thy brother Abel?

Where is thy brother Abel? Documentary Photographs of the Warsaw Ghetto

Joe J. Heydecker, Atlantis Livros, Sao Paulo, 1981
In 1981, Joe Heydecker, then living in Brazil, decided to publish his Warsaw Ghetto photographs. He wrote “I find it hard to explain why nearly forty years have passed before I was able to publish these pictures. I believe I simply had not strength enough to write the text, although I tried several times. I still feel unable to do so. Now I do what I can to set down what is seared into my memory, weak as it may be, because time is running out.”
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The Jewish Women of Ravensbrück, Concentration Camp

The Jewish Women of Ravensbrück, Concentration Camp

Rochelle G. Saidel, University of Wisconsin Press, 2004
Ravensbrück, the only major Nazi concentration camp for women was located about fifty miles north of Berlin. The camp, opened in May 1939, was the site of murder by slave labor, torture, starvation, shooting, lethal injection, "medical" experimentation, and gassing. Today it is a memorial site to those who died there. While this camp was designed to hold 5,000 women, the actual figure was six times this number. In all, some 132,000 women from all over Europe passed through the camp, including Poles, Germans, Russians, Ukrainians, Jews, French, Gypsies, and others...
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Who Will Write Our History

Who Will Write Our History: Emanuel Ringelblum, the Warsaw Ghetto, and the Oyneg Shabes Archive

Samuel Kassow, Indiana University Press, 2007
Who Will Write Our History is a fascinating study of three separate and intertwined subjects: at its heart is Emanuel Ringelblum, the historian who had the prescience to create and encourage the keeping of an archive in the Warsaw ghetto during the Holocaust. His story cannot be told without reference to the archive itself, which Ringelblum called “Oyneg Shabes” (the joy of Sabbath), primarily because its management committee met secretly to discuss the archive on Saturdays, the Jewish Sabbath...
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Youth Writing Behind the Walls

Youth Writing Behind the Walls - Avraham Cytryn’s Lodz notebooks

Avraham Cytryn, Yad Vashem, 2005
Avraham Cytryn was born in Lodz in 1927 and was undoubtedly incredibly gifted as a writer of short fiction and poetry. Only 13 when interned in the Lodz Ghetto with his mother and sister, he continued to write in every spare minute he had after work. The security of living within a safe community no longer existed, and perhaps writing helped Avraham and gave him the will to continue the fight for life...
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A Hero of Our Own

A Hero of Our Own - The Story of Varian Fry

Sheila Isenberg, Random House, 2001
The story of Varian Fry is perhaps less well known than that of Oscar Schindler, but to some he became known as the "American Schindler" or The Artist's Schindler". In 1940, Fry was sent to France by the Emergency Rescue Committee in New York, with a list of two hundred names and only three thousand dollars in his pocket. The list was made up by the Museum of Modern Art in New York and Eleanor Roosevelt, among others... Read more



The Pillar of Salt

The Pillar of Salt

Albert Memmi, Beacon Press, 1992
More than fifty years ago, Albert Memmi published The Pillar of Salt, which is a thinly disguised autobiography of the first two decades of his life. This early work of Memmi’s, first published in French in 1953, is an engaging presentation of dissonances that the boy Alexandre Mordekhai Bennillouche had to work through en route to becoming Doctor Albert Memmi, Doctor of Philosophy from the Sorbonne in Paris... Read more




The Boy  - A Holocaust Story

The Boy - A Holocaust Story

Dan Porat, Hill and Wang, 2010
We may never know the identity of the iconic photograph of a young terrified boy, hands raised above his head, surrounded by soldiers during the final destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto in April 1943.
However, through the use of 60 photographs, Dan Porat unravels the history behind the destruction of the ghetto, and identifies the Nazi soldier, Josef Blosche, who pointed his gun at the boy and those around him... Read more



Suite Française

Suite Française

Irene Nemirovsky, Vintage, 2007
In this e-newsletter, which features different aspects of the Holocaust in France, we have chosen to review a book which was written during the first years of the Second World War but was published only in 2004 in the original French, and in 2006 in an English translation. The circumstances surrounding the writing of Suite Française by Irene Nemirovsky and the personal story involved in its delayed publication by her daughter some sixty years later are as fascinating and heart- wrenching as the book itself...Read more



Smuggled in Potato Sacks

Smuggled in Potato Sacks

Edited by Solomon Abramovich and Yakov Zilberg, Vallentine Mitchell, ‏2011
Smuggled in Potato Sacks is a collection of stories compiled by Holocaust survivors Ariela Abramovich Sef and Ilana Kamber-Ash, both born in the Kovno Ghetto and hidden during the Holocaust. Inspired to preserve their own stories as well as those of other children who had been rescued, they collected as many testimonies as they could find, and in the end, put together this book with fifty stories of hidden children from the Kovno Ghetto... Read more



Alone in Berlin

Alone in Berlin

Hans Fallada, Penguin Books, 2009
The twelve years spanning 1933 till 1945 are the dark years of Nazi domination in Germany and vast stretches of conquered Europe. For the purposes of this book review, this period can be divided into the six years before the war, until 1939, and the six years of the Second World War from 1939 to 1945. The book under review presents us with a powerful canvas of the war years in Germany and specifically in Berlin... Read more



Hana’s Suitcase

Hana’s Suitcase

Karen Levine, Albert Whitman & Company, 2002
Hana’s Suitcase seems, at first glance, to be a book written for children. On the cover is a beautiful sepia-toned portrait of a little girl with a faraway look in her eyes and a slight smile. She is wearing a pressed dress with a ruffled white collar and a broach; her shiny hair is twisted and pinned up, and reflects the light. This lovely little girl in the photographic portrait ordered, no doubt, by her doting parents, could be any beloved little girl, anywhere... Read more



What Papa Told Me

What Papa Told Me

Felice Cohen, Dividends Press, 2010
This is the Holocaust testimony of Murray Schwartzbaum, from Szczekociny, Poland, as told to his granddaughter, Felice Cohen. While many such stories are told in the first-person with the help of a family member, Cohen also includes pieces of her conversation with her grandfather, opening the dialogue with the third-generation, a topic not always incorporated into Holocaust testimonies. This touching and heart wrenching story begins when Murray is a child... Read more



The Photographs in Nona’s Album

The Photographs in Nona’s Album

Jennifer Garsh, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, 2010
In this short but powerful book, suitable for grades 5-12, students will learn about Romaniote Jewry and in particular about the Koen family, through use of family photographs and text. The author, Jennifer Garsh, writes about her grandmother, Stema Koen, who lived in Janina until she was five. She is referred to by her granddaughter as Nona. Through the photographs we learn about Nona’s family, and how they lived prior to World War II... Read more



The Journal of Helene Berr

The Journal of Helene Berr

Helene Berr, Weinstein Books, 2008
Helene Berr was twenty-one years old when she started to keep a diary. The year was 1942, two years into the German occupation of France. She had grown up in a well-to-do Jewish family with strong ties to Parisian society and some elements of Jewish identity. Immersed in the busy, intellectual pursuits of Sorbonne student life, world events interrupted and with the occupation, an inexorable negative progression was begun which from 1942 is portrayed so acutely in Helene’s diary... Read more



Gertruda’s Oath: A Child, A Promise, and a Heroic Escape During World War II

Gertruda’s Oath: A Child, A Promise, and a Heroic Escape During World War II

Ram Oren, Translated by Barbara Harshav, Doubleday, 2009
In this work of nonfiction written in the style of a novel, Ram Oren weaves together two different stories of the Holocaust, and intertwines them brilliantly, leaving the reader pondering situations that he may have considered previously. Karl Rink, a German, marries Mira, a Jew. When Karl joins the SS he is happy to be earning an income and reassures his wife and daughter, Helga, that no harm will come to them and that the party’s anti-Jewish ideology has not penetrated his thoughts... Read more



The Girl in the Green Sweater: A Life in Holocaust’s Shadow

The Girl in the Green Sweater: A Life in Holocaust’s Shadow

Krystyna Chiger with Daniel Paisner, St. Martin’s Press, 2008
In this book, Krystyna Chiger recounts the story of her survival as a child as her family went from their beautiful wealthy home to the Lvov Ghetto and then into the sewers to live out the final fourteen months of the Holocaust.
Krystyna was nearly 4 years old when Germany and Russia divided Poland down the middle in 1939... Read more



The Lost

The Lost

Daniel Mendelsohn, HaperCollins, 2008
So many books have been published on the Holocaust over the last sixty-five years. Histories, survivors’ memoirs, diaries of victims, children’s books, and many more have been published in an unending effort to decipher this dark period in the history of mankind. The subtitle of this book, A Search for Six of Six Million, informs us immediately that a personal search will be at the heart of the material...
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I Choose Life

I Choose Life: Two Linked Stories of Holocaust Survival and Rebirth

Jerry L. Jennings, Sol and Goldie Finkelstein / Xlibris, 2009
This well-written book tells the stories of Sol Finkelstein and Goldie Cukier Finkelstein, two Holocaust survivors who met after the war and married. Their son Joseph Finkelstein made it a point to record his parent’s Holocaust stories so that they would not be forgotten, and this book is a testament to them and the legacy they created. Told in the first person perspective, the stories of Sol and Goldie are initially told separately, and then their stories intertwine... Read more



The Hidden Girl

The Hidden Girl: A True Story of the Holocaust

Lola Rein Kaufman with Lois Metzger / Troll Associates, 1999
This short testimony is fitting for middle school students who have studied the Holocaust and are prepared to confront a difficult story written for their age level. The teacher should eliminate sections that she/he feels might be too detailed or violent for his/her students. Lola Rein was a young child when war broke out in her small town of Czortkow, Poland. She recalls the escalation of antisemitism and the arrival of the German army in July 1941... Read more



Mothers, Sisters, Resisters

Mothers, Sisters, Resisters: Oral Histories of Women Who Survived the Holocaust

Edited by Brana Gurewitsch / University of Alabama Press, 1998
Brana Gurewitsch has skillfully interviewed twenty-five women, Jewish and non-Jewish, who found themselves in the most difficult of roles during the Shoah. The book covers three of these roles – mothers, sisters, and resisters. Being a mother during the Shoah meant instinctively trying to keep your child or children alive, finding food, providing shelter and clothing, and trying to maintain a sense of calm when life as you had known it no longer existed... Read more



The Girls of Room 28

The Girls of Room 28 – Friendship, Hope, and Survival in Theresienstadt

Hannelore Brenner / Shocken Books, 2009
Translated from the original German into English, this book relates the story of several of the over one hundred children who were incarcerated in Girl’s Home L410, Room 28 in the Theresienstadt Ghetto. The “girls” who survived and found each other after many years, meet regularly in Spindlemuhle, Czech Republic, and Brenner joined them several times, in order to interview ten of the fifteen girls who survived this terrible experience. This has enabled her to relate... Read more



Clara’s War

Clara’s War – One Girl’s Story of Survival

Clara Kramer with Stephen Glantz / Harper Collins, 2009
This book is based on Clara Kramer’s diary of her years in hiding from the Nazis. Valentine Beck, a Volksdsdeutsch (ethnic German), his wife Julia, and their daughter Ala allowed eighteen Jews, including Clara and her family, to hide in a small, suffocating bunker that was dug out of the basement underneath his house. Beck was known as a... Read more




Light in Darkness

Light in Darkness: A Survivor’s Story

Simon Sterling as told to Phyllis Sterling Jacobs / Phyllis Sterling Jacobs, 2005
Simon Sterling finally shared his wartime experiences with his daughter Phyllis. Snippets of information had filtered through the silence of forty years, but she had never heard the full story. The result is a very moving account of his survival while hiding in the forests of Poland with his wife and other family... Read more






Dividing Hearts

Dividing Hearts – The Removal of Jewish Children from Gentile Families in Poland in the Immediate Post-Holocaust Years

Emunah Nachmany-Gafny / Yad Vashem Publications, ‏2009
Towards the end of the Second World War, and in the wake of the Nazi retreat, the allies began liberating occupied Europe. Thousands of Jewish children had been in hiding for years in convents, placed with gentile families... Read more





48 Hours of Kristallnacht

48 Hours of Kristallnacht: Night of Destruction/Dawn of the Holocaust – An Oral History

Mitchell G. Bard / The Lyons Press, 2008
Published to coincide with the 70th anniversary of this pivotal event, Bard uses eyewitness accounts of those who were young children and teenagers to describe the incidents that took place on November 9-10, 1938, which became known as the Kristallnacht pogrom... Read more






Advocate for the Doomed

Advocate for the Doomed: The Diaries and Papers of James G. Mcdonald, 1932-1935

Edited by Richard Breitman, Barbara Mcdonald Stewart, and Severin Hochberg / Indiana University Press, 2007
In the first published work on James Grover McDonald, this book is the first of a 3-volume series that uses his diaries and papers to elucidate McDonald's illustrious career. First as the League of Nation's High Commissioner for German Refugees... Read more




Auschwitz-Prozess 4 ks 2/63

Auschwitz-Prozess 4 ks 2/63

Edited by Irmtrud Wojak and the Fritz Bauer Institut Staff / Fritz Bauer Institut, 2005
This is one of the heaviest books (in terms of sheer weight) on the Holocaust that has appeared in the last decade. Yet any effort invested in reading it (and carrying it) is well worthwhile. This volume, published concurrently with the ongoing historical exhibition in German cities marking 40 years since... Read more






Beyond Humanity: A Forensic Doctor in Auschwitz

Beyond Humanity: A Forensic Doctor in Auschwitz

Miklos Nyiszli; second edition edited by Andreas Kilian and Friedrich Herber / Karl Dietz Verlag, 2005
The publication of the autobiography of Miklos Nyiszli is an important event for historical research on Auschwitz in general and especially in the field of research on the Sonderkommando in Auschwitz-Birkenau. Nyiszli's memoirs were the first publication on the unknown subject of the... Read more






Children Who Survived the Final Solution

Children Who Survived the Final Solution

Edited by Peter Tarjan / iUniverse, 2004
Published at the initiative of the Child Survivors of the Holocaust in South Florida, this volume collects twenty-six personal testimonies of children who survived the Holocaust. The result is a moving and fascinating living memory of a lost, interrupted childhood. The survivors, today grandparents, remember their childhood clearly and prove again... Read more




Das Auschwitz Album

The Auschwitz Album – The Story of a Transport

Edited by Israel Gutman and Bella Gutterman / Wallstein Verlag; Yad Vashem; Göttingen, 2000
This is the German edition of one of the most significant visual sources on the Shoah. Prior to this edition, a Hebrew and an English version were published. This collection of 207 photos was made on the ramp of Birkenau in late Spring, 1944, by two SS-photographers: Walter and Hoffmann... Read more






The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations

The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations: Rescuers of Jews during the Holocaust in Poland

Editor-in-Chief: Israel Gutman / Yad Vashem, 2005
This encyclopedia is a project that documents and honors the noble actions of more than 20,000 non-Jews throughout Europe who endangered themselves in order to save Jews during the Holocaust and who have been granted the title of Righteous Among the Nations from Yad Vashem... Read more





The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations

The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations: Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust

Editor-in-Chief: Israel Gutman / Yad Vashem, 2003 through 2007
The concept of "Righteous Among the Nations" is based on a Rabbinic precept whereby one who saves one life is considered to have saved an entire world. How did this idea manifest itself during the Holocaust? There were people who adopted Jewish children and passed them off as nieces or... Read more





Flares of Memory: Survivors Remember

Flares of Memory: Survivors Remember – Stories of Childhood during the Holocaust

Anita Brostoff (ed.) with Sheila Chamovitz / Oxford University Press, 2001
This compendium of testimony, written by survivors, is a product of memory-writing workshops conducted by editors Brostoff and Chamovitz. The book covers many aspects of Holocaust research: Jewish life before the Holocaust... Read more






For The People I Love and Can't Forget

For The People I Love and Can't Forget

Maria Szapszewicz / Jacob's House Press, 2006
Born in Lodz, Maria (nee Wajchendler) survived the Holocaust, as did her mother and one brother. Her other brother, father, and extended family perished. She spent time in the Lodz and Szydlowiec ghettos, worked in an ammunition factory in Starochowice, and was eventually sent to Auschwitz. She was liberated in the Bergen-Belsen... Read more




I Have Lived a Thousand Years – Growing up in the Holocaust

I Have Lived a Thousand Years – Growing up in the Holocaust

Livia Bitton-Jackson / Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1997
The author, whose former name was Elli Friedmann, lives a happy carefree life in her village of Somorja, Czechoslovakia, set in the beautiful Carpathian foothills. She writes of the life of any thirteen-year-old who has only... Read more






Hidden from the Holocaust: Stories of Resilient Children Who Survived and Thrived

Hidden from the Holocaust: Stories of Resilient Children Who Survived and Thrived

Kerry Bluglass / Westport, 2003
Psychiatrist Kerry Bluglass presents fifteen interviews with survivors who, as children during the Holocaust, were hidden by non-Jews and thus rescued from an almost certain death. Today, all are stable, healthy, intelligent, and share a surprising sense of humor. Together, these survivors show... Read more






Holocaust Survivor Cookbook

Holocaust Survivor Cookbook – Collected from Around the World

Joanne Caras / Caras and Associates, Inc., 2007
As the title might imply, this is not a regular cookbook. In fact, it is quite unusual. Sarah Caras, the daughter of a Holocaust survivor, and her husband Jonathan (new immigrants to Israel from the U.S.A.), have succeeded in collecting 100 stories from Holocaust survivors from many countries... Read more






The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia

The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia – Facing the Holocaust

Livia Rothkirchen / University of Nebraska Press and Yad Vashem, 2005
On March 16, 1939, Germany annexed the Czech part of Czechoslovakia. The Protectorate under the control of the Germans until May, 1945, became known as Bohemia and Moravia. Konstantin von Neurath was... Read more






A Journey of Life through a Concentration Camp

A Journey of Life through a Concentration Camp

Dagmar Ostermann / Verlag Turia & Kant, 2005
The appearance of every new biography connected with Auschwitz is of huge importance for our ability to understand this extermination center which has become a synonym for the Shoah. Holocaust survivors' memoirs enable those born after the war to identify with the innocent victims of Auschwitz and to gain a deeper insight into the events... Read more




The King Of Children

The King Of Children – A Biography Of Janusz Korczak

Betty Jean Lifton / Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1988
Putting down a lifetime's work with children in a few short lines is not possible. Here is a book which relates the story of a Polish Jewish doctor, writer, and educator who, in the last years of his life cared for two hundred orphans in the crowded orphanage, forced to move twice within the Warsaw Ghetto. Betty Jean Lifton has put together a moving and powerful... Read more




Janusz Korczak's Children

Janusz Korczak's Children

Gloria Spielman / Kar-Ben Publishing, 2007
In this book, Gloria Spielman tells the moving and true story of Janusz Korczak (Henryk Goldszmidt), the Polish-Jewish champion of children's rights. Korczak saw, from a very early age, the dichotomy between the privileged children, and those who came from disadvantaged backgrounds, and wanted to help to make a better world for children... Read more




Kristallnacht – Prelude to Destruction

Kristallnacht – Prelude to Destruction

Martin Gilbert / Harper Press, 2006
This book presents the true and moving story of a group of young children and adults living under Nazi occupation in Budejovice, Czechoslovakia. Martin Gilbert traces anti-Jewish discrimination and legislation that began when Hitler came to power in 1933, culminating in the 1938 pogrom which became known as the Kristallnacht pogrom... Read more




L’Album D’Auschwitz

L’Album D’Auschwitz

Serge Klarsfeld, et al. / Coédition Al Dante et Fondation pour la mémoire de la Shoah, 2005
It might seem to some that after the complete documented and scientific edition of this Album published two years ago by Yad Vashem in cooperation with the Auschwitz-Birkenau National Museum, a new publication would be superfluous, especially since the Album has also been published... Read more






Nazi Europe and the Final Solution

Nazi Europe and the Final Solution

Edited by David Bankier and Israel Gutman / Yad Vashem, 2003
International conferences are usually accompanied by a book that is comprised of the papers that were given during the proceedings, together with additional scientific commentary and literature. The volume we have here originated with a conference that took place in Warsaw in 1999, under the initiative of Yad Vashem, the Warsaw Jewish Historical Institute... Read more




Poyln – My Life Within Jewish Life in Poland

Poyln – My Life Within Jewish Life in Poland

Yehiel Yeshaia Trunk / University of Toronto Press, 2007
Yehiel Yeshaia Trunk, a well-known writer, was born in the Polish village of Osmolsk in 1887. His early works were written in Hebrew, but under the influence of the Jewish writer Isaac Leib Peretz, he began to write in Yiddish. He and his wife left Europe in 1940 and settled in New York, where he began to write his seven-volume memoir originally published... Read more




Refugees and Rescue

Refugees and Rescue: The Diaries and Papers of James G. Mcdonald, 1935-1945

Edited by Richard Breitman, Barbara Mcdonald Stewart, and Severin Hochberg / Indiana University Press, 2009
Continuing where the prequel ends, this book is the second published in a 3-volume set in cooperation with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Refugees and Rescue presents a compilation of the personal papers... Read more




I Refused to Die

I Refused to Die: Stories of Boston Area Holocaust Survivors and Soldiers Who Liberated the Concentration Camps of World War II

Edited by Susie Davidson / Ibbetson Street Press, 2005
This collection of testimonies, written by the survivors in their own words, is an example of the important localized documentation work carried out by many Holocaust centers in the United States. Stories include those of Michael Kraus... Read more





Remembering: Voices of the Holocaust

Remembering: Voices of the Holocaust – A New History in the Words of the Men and Women who Survived

Lyn Smith / Carroll and Graf, 2006
Lyn Smith has been involved with the creation of the Holocaust Sound Archive at the Imperial War Museum, and has interviewed Holocaust survivors for over twenty-five years. The voices collected in this volume provide a unique insight into the complex human reality behind the abstract... Read more





Resilience and Courage

Resilience and Courage: Women, Men, and The Holocaust

Nechama Tec / Yale University Press, 2003
Did Jewish men and women experience the Holocaust in different ways? Did female Jewish prisoners suffer more than their male counterparts? These questions have not received adequate scholarly attention over the last thirty or forty years. However, Holocaust researchers have... Read more






A Safe House: Holland 1940-1945

A Safe House: Holland 1940-1945

Maria Jacobs / Seraphim Editions, 2005
The writer is an author and a poet. She is the daughter of Righteous Among the Nations Wilhemina Wolsak-Mendelson, and she herself has been recognized as one. In the book she describes her mother's and brother's activity in rescuing Dutch Jews, as well as that of her own. Her mother married one of the Jews she saved, named Mendelson... Read more




Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account

Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities, and the True Story Behind The List

David M. Crowe / Westview Press, 2004
This book describes Schindler's actions as a rescuer of Jews in Cracow and Brinnlitz, and Schindler's life before the Second World War. In 1938, Schindler was stationed in Czechoslovakia as an agent for the German military intelligence gathering information prior to the planned... Read more





The Search for Major Plagge

The Search for Major Plagge: The Nazi Who Saved Jews

Michael Good / Fordham University Press, 2005
This is the story of a Major in the German army who managed a workshop repairing military vehicles located in Vilna (today: Vilnius, Lithuania). Hundreds of Jews from the ghetto were employed in this workshop, thus saving them from deportation. Alongside skilled vehicle repairmen were many who were not, yet they were still allowed to reside... Read more




Shards of Memory

Shards of Memory: Narratives of Holocaust Survival

Edited by Yehudi Lindeman / Praeger Publishers, 2007
Yehudi Lindeman is Professor Emeritus of English at McGill University and director of Living Testimonies, a center for Holocaust research and documentation in Montreal. In 1990, Lindeman contributed to founding the World Federation of Jewish Child Survivors. As a child survivor of the Holocaust, he was separated from his family... Read more




Survivors – True Stories of Children in the Holocaust

Survivors – True Stories of Children in the Holocaust

Allan Zullo and Mara Bovsun / Scholastic Inc., 2004
Mathei, aged ten, escapes from a crowded cattle car going to Auschwitz and becomes a partisan. Seventeen-year-old Jack Gruener survives a grueling death march, and despite terrible conditions, tries to help a fellow Jew along the way. Five-year-old Sarah is hidden by a Polish family in a small attic with her family for two years. Herbert Karliner leaves... Read more




A Teenager in Hitler's Death Camps

A Teenager in Hitler's Death Camps

Benny Grunfeld / Benbella Books Edition, 2007
Benny and his brother Herbert survived the horrors of Auschwitz death camp, a gruelling death march, the labor camp Dora-Mittelbau (Nordhausen), and finally the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen, from where they were liberated. Translated from the original Swedish, this autobiography tells the story of Benny, a Hungarian teenager swept into... Read more




The Boys: Triumph Over Adversity

The Boys: Triumph Over Adversity

Martin Gilbert / Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2001
Martin Gilbert craftily tells the story of 732 survivors, who called themselves 'The Boys,' though the group included about 80 girls. While this book recounts the devastation and disintegration of the lives of these 732 young Jews, most of whom were around 9 or 10 years old when the war broke out, it also generates feelings of hope... Read more




The Underground Reporters

The Underground Reporters

Kathy Kacer / Second Story Press, 2004
This book presents the true and moving story of a group of young children and adults living under Nazi occupation in Budejovice, Czechoslovakia. As their freedom becomes increasingly curtailed under the Nazis, they are no longer able to go out to play, swim, go to the cinema, or lead a normal life. Fifteen-year-old Ruda Stadler decides to start a newspaper... Read more